Editorial & Writing


“I’ve been in the biz a long time, but am still amazed when an editor can surface all of this—things which I see now, but didn’t before.”

—Kate Rogers, Editor-in-Chief, The Mountaineers Books

Editorial Services

Editorial services remain the heart of our indie publishing packages, both for individuals and corporations, and differentiate our level of service in publishing partnerships. Whether you need an editorial expert in finance, cookbooks, or self-help, we have your perfect match. Our editors work closely with authors and clients to take their work to the next level. That all begins with the first phase of editorial services, where logic, structure, transitions, and syntax are addressed in the manner that's right for you.

 

Service

Level One

Level Two

Level Three

Comprehensive multipage editorial letter covering a range of structural issues (also called a manuscript assessment or critique)
Marked-up manuscript that provides specific suggestions for how to implement proposed revisions
Detailed line edit in Microsoft Word that addresses language, word choice, sentence structure, flow, and repetition
 

Ghostwriting

From business experts to executives to attorneys, many would-be indie authors have the right material for a book but don’t have the know-how or, frankly, the time to execute. We do. Let us connect you with an experienced ghost to tell your story in a way that captures your personality, amplifies your message, and attracts your audience. We will then take that manuscript and produce the perfect finished book.

Select Titles:

Girls, I still have questions:

How long does developmental editing take?

For an average manuscript, one editorial pass takes a month to six weeks.

Does the developmental edit include copyediting?

Dev editing is not the same as copyediting and is not a substitute for that next valuable step. Copyeditors work to enforce style choices, correct grammar and spelling, and engage in fact-checking. Our editorial process is comprised of a minimum of three distinct steps: developmental editing, copyediting, and proofreading.

What if I don't think I need a developmental edit?

While some people feel they can skip this initial and vital step before publishing their work, we have yet to serve a client who was not grateful they didn't cut corners. Not only does dev editing help shape the narrative form of your book, tailoring it to your audience, it's also the time to make line-level adjustments for voice and clarity. Going straight to copyedit (or, gasp, proof!) is like painting a cracked or crumbling wall.

Where can I find more information?

Get in touch with Christina Henry de Tessan.